Blog 7A.  Mergers and Split-Ups

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A “belief” is something you’re comfortable with. Mergers make beliefs change. The company’s culture changes because there are new people.

In a merger, the new beliefs give everyone a conflict within themselves: everyone from the top to the bottom of the new company. Often people in the new company also have conflicts with each other.

People must discuss both conflicts, the internal and those with others. The listener may be a colleague, a mentor, an adviser, or a psychologist. Most companies pay for people at the top to do this. Everyone needs to do it, but there isn’t money for everyone.

An open meeting can help the staff for whom there aren’t funds, as Patrick Lencioni described in Silos, Politics, and Turf Wars.

A facilitator chairs the meeting. All staff attend. Executives and managers attend and listen but don’t speak.

The staff vents fears, frustrations, and suggestions until all have vented and are satisfied they were heard. The facilitator declares breaks. During breaks the facilitator discusses privately, with the executives and senior managers, the major points that were just aired.

After each break, the facilitator tells everyone that the executive team will handle the concerns just raised; by when, and, as much as possible, what each outcome is likely to be.

[The discussion will be continued in Blog 7B.]

Illustrations in my blogs are either my own drawings or courtesy of pixabay.com

Contact me at 650-762-6755 or pieterk@post.harvard.edu for more information or to start a conversation.

Pieter Kark, MD, San Mateo, CA 94401-2238

 

Illustrations in my blogs are either my own drawings or courtesy of pixabay.com

 

Contact me at 650-762-6755 or pieterk@post.harvard.edu for more information or to start a conversation.

 

Pieter Kark, MD, San Mateo, CA 94401-2238

 

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