Blog 1A. Recognizing a Conflict

Frustrated ManThe CEO called an emergency meeting of the executive team. “The CFO just showed me our new data. We’re still increasing productivity and profits, but the curve has slowed down a bit.”

“Why don’t we wait a while longer and see?” said someone. “Maybe in a few more days or a week things will be back on track.”

“I don’t know”, said someone else. “If it gets worse instead of better, we could get in real trouble.”

“Yeh”, said a third. “On LinkedIn, I saw this profile of a guy who’s been a psychiatrist. He says pain like we’re having is likely from an internal conflict. He can come and explore it, get back to us at the end of a day, and give us a plan.”

“I’ve seen it too”, said another. “He’s also been doing this for 40 years and has a long track record. He’ll stay for as long as we need him, but then he’ll leave so he’s not a permanent item on our budget.”

“You’re right”, said the third. “And there’s another thing. If he finds something he’s not comfortable handling, he’ll recommend someone else he trusts, and he won’t charge us for his day’s work.”

“There’s more”, said the other. “If we like what he’s done, and we decide we’d like to handle internal conflicts ourselves in the future, he’ll train us to do it.”

“OK”, said the CEO. “I’ll see if he can come in later today or tomorrow to talk.”

 

Illustrations in my blogs are either my own drawings or courtesy of pixabay.com 

Contact me at 650-762-6755 or pieterk@post.harvard.edu for more information or to start a conversation.

Pieter Kark, MD, San Mateo, CA 94401-2238

 

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